May 2024

Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun
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  • Teachers Who Write Conference
  • OF MYTHS, OF TALES, OF… MAKING AND MYTHING IN VERSE
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  • DIVINE GIFTS AND THEIR TERRIBLE COST: READING EMILY WILSON’S NEW TRANSLATION OF THE ILIAD
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4
5
6
7
  • THE REALITY OF THE POEM (2): A WORKSHOP & CRAFT CLASS
8
9
  • DIVINE GIFTS AND THEIR TERRIBLE COST: READING EMILY WILSON’S NEW TRANSLATION OF THE ILIAD
10
11
12
13
14
  • THE REALITY OF THE POEM (2): A WORKSHOP & CRAFT CLASS
15
16
  • DIVINE GIFTS AND THEIR TERRIBLE COST: READING EMILY WILSON’S NEW TRANSLATION OF THE ILIAD
17
18
19
20
21
  • THE REALITY OF THE POEM (2): A WORKSHOP & CRAFT CLASS
22
23
  • DIVINE GIFTS AND THEIR TERRIBLE COST: READING EMILY WILSON’S NEW TRANSLATION OF THE ILIAD
24
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30
  • DIVINE GIFTS AND THEIR TERRIBLE COST: READING EMILY WILSON’S NEW TRANSLATION OF THE ILIAD
31
May 30, 2024
  • DIVINE GIFTS AND THEIR TERRIBLE COST: READING EMILY WILSON’S NEW TRANSLATION OF THE ILIAD

    May 30, 2024  6:00 pm - 8:30 pm

    More details: https://classroom.ruthstonehouse.org/product/divine-gifts-and-their-terrible-cost-reading-emily-wilsons-new-translation-of-the-iliad/

    The famous god whose legs are bent replied,

    ‘Take heart, dispel these worries from your mind.

    I wish that I could hide him far away

    from cruel death when harsh fate comes for him

    as easily as I can make him armor

    so marvelous that any human being

    would be astonished at the sight.’

                                  —The Iliad, Book 18

    Emily Wilson opens the introduction to her thrilling new translation of The Iliad by explaining that it “tells two interwoven stories across its twenty-four books. The first describes the overwhelming anger of a Greek warrior, Achilles, and its catastrophic consequences. The second tell how a brave Trojan warrior, Hector, leave his city and family to attack the Greek invaders—and returns home only after death. […] The beautiful word minunthadios, ‘short-lived,’ is used for both Achilles and Hector, and applies to all of us. We die too soon, and there is no adequate recompense for the terrible, inevitable loss of life. Yet through poetry, the words, actions, and feelings of some long-ago brief lives may be remembered even three thousand years later.”

     

    In this class, we will gain a better understanding of not only these two interwoven stories, but also what the epic poem has to say about its sprawling cast of humans and gods, fate, power, war, love, justice, and more. Focus will be given to the narrative, poetic technique, and the translation itself. We will cover 4 books of the epic per class over the course of 6 weeks and supplement our discussion with the following incisive secondary sources:

     

    “The Iliad, or The Poem of Force” by Simone Weil

    “The Iliad as Ethical Thinking: Politics, Pity, And The Operation Of Esteem” by Dean Hammer

    “The Poetics of Loss in Greek Epic” by Sheila Murnaghan

    “Bitch that I Am”: Self-Blame and Self- Assertion in the Iliad” by Ruby Blondell

    See more details

June 6, 2024
  • DIVINE GIFTS AND THEIR TERRIBLE COST: READING EMILY WILSON’S NEW TRANSLATION OF THE ILIAD

    June 6, 2024  6:00 pm - 8:30 pm

    More details: https://classroom.ruthstonehouse.org/product/divine-gifts-and-their-terrible-cost-reading-emily-wilsons-new-translation-of-the-iliad/

    The famous god whose legs are bent replied,

    ‘Take heart, dispel these worries from your mind.

    I wish that I could hide him far away

    from cruel death when harsh fate comes for him

    as easily as I can make him armor

    so marvelous that any human being

    would be astonished at the sight.’

                                  —The Iliad, Book 18

    Emily Wilson opens the introduction to her thrilling new translation of The Iliad by explaining that it “tells two interwoven stories across its twenty-four books. The first describes the overwhelming anger of a Greek warrior, Achilles, and its catastrophic consequences. The second tell how a brave Trojan warrior, Hector, leave his city and family to attack the Greek invaders—and returns home only after death. […] The beautiful word minunthadios, ‘short-lived,’ is used for both Achilles and Hector, and applies to all of us. We die too soon, and there is no adequate recompense for the terrible, inevitable loss of life. Yet through poetry, the words, actions, and feelings of some long-ago brief lives may be remembered even three thousand years later.”

     

    In this class, we will gain a better understanding of not only these two interwoven stories, but also what the epic poem has to say about its sprawling cast of humans and gods, fate, power, war, love, justice, and more. Focus will be given to the narrative, poetic technique, and the translation itself. We will cover 4 books of the epic per class over the course of 6 weeks and supplement our discussion with the following incisive secondary sources:

     

    “The Iliad, or The Poem of Force” by Simone Weil

    “The Iliad as Ethical Thinking: Politics, Pity, And The Operation Of Esteem” by Dean Hammer

    “The Poetics of Loss in Greek Epic” by Sheila Murnaghan

    “Bitch that I Am”: Self-Blame and Self- Assertion in the Iliad” by Ruby Blondell

    See more details

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